Category: Barefoot Bliss

Getting back into Homeschooling after the Christmas Break

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Monday 6th January: our first day back to homeschooling since we decided to break for Christmas around the start of December. I can tell you now the extended break has done us all the world of good.  I personally feel motivated to get back into routine and I have felt the children’s excitement rising as I have let “slip” some of our plans for the coming weeks.

We are relatively new to home education having only officially removed the children from school in September 2019. The break over Christmas from planning and implementing topics has given me a chance to reflect on what has been working for us as a family and I have realised a number of things; firstly, I work better when there is a plan in place, secondly the children work better when they know what is expected of them and when there are more hands on activities to take part in and thirdly we all need more time outside.

With all that in mind I have decided we will loosely follow a number of curricula / teaching units for the upcoming term to give us a plan to follow, namely Torchlight Level K, Exploring Nature with Children and Be Naturally Curious. Alongside these we will use One Third Stories in Spanish, Reading Eggs, Activity Village and the Osmo. When possible Mathematics will be incorporated seamlessly through measuring, recording, drawing and hands on interactions such as shopping and making, otherwise I will be gathering ideas from some Waldorf texts and ideas I have found online.  To help the children with what’s expected of them I have started to implement some routines with them, the first of which is the morning routine. This involves them getting up, dressed, washed and making their beds and sorting their own stuff out before coming downstairs.  To encourage us all to get outdoors more we will be organising and taking part in a local forest families event once a week and we are taking part in the 1000 hours outside challenge this year.

I did spend a lot of time researching books and activities for us starting back so that the first week would go as smoothly as possible. My main concern is always involving my toddler but at the same time allowing the girls to get on with their work. This week we will be focusing on European Russia with Torchlight Level K and the Winter Sky with Exploring Nature with Children. Here is the first day’s plan and how it worked out:

Establishing a Morning Routine: we started a new morning routine whereby the girls get up, washed, dressed and make their beds before coming downstairs for breakfast. Here is a snippet from the routine we have implemented.Morning time routine for children

To get this off to a good start I printed the girls’ routine check lists, laminated them and put them on clip boards.  I placed the clip boards beside their beds with their clean clothes for the morning. This actually went really well as it gave the girls a plan to follow and some responsibility for getting themselves sorted.

We are loosely following the torchlight curriculum which is literature based so there is a lot of reading involved.  The main concern people expressed to me over this curriculum is the price of the books, so to overcome this I simply bought only the spines (main recommended texts) and some books that sounded really interesting that I felt we would read more than once. I also only planned for the first 6 weeks of the curriculum so that if it wasn’t a good fit we were not in the situation that I had a whole year of work sitting wasted.

Work Session One: I read two books to the children while they drew at the kitchen table. The first one Anya’s Secret Society is a recommended text from the curriculum and tells the story of a young Russian girl who is left handed. In Russian society being left handed is still frowned upon and this story from the child’s point of view explains how the child had to hide and draw with her left hand in secret. This was a great for discussing how people can be treated unfairly for appearing different. Both my girls found it very strange that left handed children would be forced to use their right hand and this led us to discussing how not that long ago children in the UK were also forced to use their right hand even when they were left handed.

 

The second book was one I got from the library and it provides facts about Russia written in the format of a selection of short informative blog posts. The children found these interesting and each short blog post had a full color photograph accompanying it. Russia is a great country for big features such as the deepest lake and largest land area, the idea of items being the biggest in the world helped to capture my children’s interest,

To give my voice a break I then put on an audio book of the Nutcracker for the children to listen to while I prepared a snack.  I have found out two things in the last 6 months that make our days easier, firstly keep the children fed and secondly when possible utilise tools such as audio books and documentaries to your advantage to get other jobs completed while the children are engaged.

After our snack and audio book it was time to get some fresh air. Another thing I have realised since starting our homeschooling journey is that we all need regular fresh air breaks; some days I start with a walk at 8.30am as I find the children have much better levels of concentration once they have had some exercise. After a 40 minute walk/scoot outside we were ready for session two.

Work Session Two: We started this session by looking at both the globe and the world map and finding our country and Russia on each.  I then read sections related to Russia from three more recommended texts: The Smithsonian Children’s Illustrated Atlas, A Year Full of Stories and The Atlas of Animal Adventures.

The Illustrated Atlas is very informative but I found it easiest to just let each child pick one or two pieces of information to read out rather than try to read it all and I plan to go back to it another day.

The story about the Little Red Hen from the Year Full of Stories book was based on how if you are not prepared to put in any work you are not entitled to have share of the spoils.  This is a great way for imparting these important ideas to our children and mine were able to point out the fairness in the story straight away.

Before we read the section on Siberian Tigers from the Atlas of Animal Adventures I let the kids watch a Go Jetters episode on Saint Basil’s Cathedral in St Petersburg. This gave me enough time to set up a tiger habitat for the children to play in.

We read about the Siberian Tigers and how there are only 500 left in the wild. After this the children played in some fake snow with model tigers for the next hour while I prepared some food for lunch and dinner.

The taste friendly fake snow is simply corn flour (corn starch in the USA) mixed with olive oil in a 8:1 ratio. We also added cottonwool balls to represent snow balls and some pine-cones and wooden trees for the tigers to hide behind. The tiger habitat was definitely the favourite activity of the day. Good points about this “snow” was it was easy to clean up and I was not worried about the kids putting their hands in their mouths as I knew it was taste safe furthermore it kept really well and we were able to play with it all week.

Sensory bin with fake snow for tiger habitat

I had decided we would make a Russian Potato Salad called an Olivier Salad. This was simply because we had left over roast chicken, baked potatoes and boiled eggs so we used up our left overs and made a new dinner for that night – win win in my book.  By this stage however the children were not very interested in leaving their tiger world so I made most of the salad myself while they played.

Preparing an Olivier Salad

The salad contained green peppers, grated carrot, chopped cucumber, cooked potato, boiled eggs, thawed frozen peas and cooked chicken all mixed with mayo.  Traditionally this dish would be made with ham. As advised in the torchlight curriculum I made a recipe chart to record our new recipes and what we thought of them, Miss 7 rated it a 4 and Miss 5 only a 2 out of 5.  i thought it was delicious and had it for my lunch the next day too – waste not want not.

I had planned to also read another book, draw maps and measure and record the overnight rain fall in our newly made rain gauge but this was not going to happen and we had friends over to play instead. Sometimes it is best to end on a high note rather than try to complete all the activities.

I hope you have enjoyed an insight into a day in our homeschooling life, please comment to let me know if you would like to see more of these types of posts.

Mixing Colours

We are doing a unit on colours today, using home made play dough, coloured with food colouring.

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Recipe For Home Made Playdough

  • 2 cups of plain flour.
  • 3/4 cup salt.
  • 4 teaspoons cream of tartar.
  • 2 cups lukewarm water.
  • 2 Tablespoons of vegetable oil (coconut oil works too)
  • Food colouring, optional

Primary Colours

I made the playdough last night and added the food colouring this morning, to make three large balls of play dough, one each of red, blue and yellow that I shared out between the girls. These are the primary colours.

Secondary Colours

They then mixed the playdough to create the secondary colours, orange, green and purple.

Colour Wheel

This is a video about the primary and secondary colours and creating a colour wheel:

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I downloaded a free book on colours. You can get this free, printable colour theory book for kids by visiting this Pinterest link and clicking on the picture. This will take you to a site, where you enter your name and address and get a free download of a colour theory book. The picture below shows the secondary colours made, along with a copy of the downloadable book that we used.

We also watched some useful videos on colour.

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A song about mixing colours and the new colours that are made.

A video song about the colours of the rainbow.

Writing Work

Our writing work was “My Favourite Colour”.

Harvest Moon

A ceremony about harvest time in Africa.

 

Not all films about harvest time are factual, occasionally there is a spoof film. This is a classic April Fool’s Joke by the BBC, showing the spaghetti harvest on the borders of Italy and Switzerland.

 

Homeschooling Ideas And Lessons

Home School Or Not

www.barefootblissandbooks.comMany people have home schooled their children over the years. There is a LOT of knowledge, innovation, creativity and real fun learning out there that we can plug into whether you home school your children or not. After all, children are home with you each evening and all weekends and being able to play along with them, giving them fun things to do that are also educational is a great way to bond with your children, as well as keep them occupied.

Why Homeschool

This lady home schooled her four children because they were not making progress in school and the school had not even let her know. She was able to improve her children’s understanding and learning by focusing on areas of weakness and making learning fun and relevant. She also points out that children who are being bullied in school may benefit from home schooling and that they do not need to suffer from lack of social interactivity. Read her take on home schooling here.

Making An Exploding Mini Book

This is a great tutorial not only for home schooled children but for anyone who likes crafts, including journalling. It shows you how to make a mini folding book that folds flat enough to be placed inside another book, such as a diary or journal. The folds create a number of small areas or boxes in which you can write or draw something. Examples of mini books that others have created are shown. You can visit the tutorial for the exploding mini book here. The same author also has articles on making an Ancient Egypt lapbook, a salt dough map and a shoe box diorama. So lots of projects here. She has also included many links to other resources. Here is another of her pages, showing lots of different kinds of mini books and one showing how to make wheel books and another on making matchbooks.

Making The Simplest Lap Book

This tutorial shows how to make a hot dog lap book and many others and how to add them into the simplest lap book. It has videos and other resources.

Lesson Plans

Telling The Time

Teaching children to tell the time can be hard work. This article shows how a mother with two children with Down Syndrome taught them to tell the time. The principles would work for any child.

Sense Of Touch

Great ideas here for showing children the sense of touch.

Art

A great many resources here for teaching art, using the artist Monet.

Science Notebooks

How to keep science notebooks that are interesting and show what you have learned.

Flies

Great article here about the Old Black Fly with lots of ideas and information. There is also a great video with no words. It is funny and allows children to make up their own story and write it down.

Summary

There are a great many ideas, lessons and hints available for creating lessons that suit your child’s needs. The above links are just a few of what is available online.

 

 

 

What To Do In Order To Home school Your Kids Efficiently

The decision to homeschool your children is one of the most momentous choices you may ever make. The key to successfully undertaking a homeschooling adventure is to acquire as much knowledge as possible before you begin. Read the tips that follow, and you will have the foundation you need to get things started.

Sit down as a family each Sunday and discuss the upcoming week. This allows everyone to know what is expected of them during the week and how each person can help make the week more successful. Planning also gives everyone the opportunity to take part in field trips and projects.

When you are teaching preschoolers at the same time as older children, set aside some individual time for both. This area should be geared for their fun, with toys and games on site. Ask the older kids to play with the younger ones. They will both learn more, and the older child will feel useful and confident in their skills.

Many parents are nervous and insecure about their ability to effectively home-school their children. To bolster your confidence, think about how much you have already taught the child you plan to home school. Chances are; they have learned everything they know from you, including important educational fundamentals like vocabulary.

Remember that when you are homeschooling you do not need to follow a classroom set up. The learning environment can be a lot more flexible, and you can tailor it to fit you and the child’s needs. If your child has a hard time rising in the morning, instead of trying to teach them chemistry at 7am, start their classes a little later in the morning or later in the afternoon.

Be sure that you learn what your area’s requirements are in regard to homeschooling. This will ensures you to remain in compliance in the grade level that you are teaching and fulfill the number of hours that you must teach. When you are not in compliance, you risk your child’s ability to get accepted into college.

Read a variety of titles to ensure that your child receives a well-rounded education. How-to articles can give you a variety of hands-on activities to do with your child. Before you child begins studying a specific subject such as World History, visit your local library and check out a children’s history book along with an age appropriate book. Use the children’s history book to give you a broad overview of the information that should be taught, and use the other book for specific information to include in your lesson plan.

Research the resources available in your area. Certain establishments may have special classes or activities designed particularly for homeschooled children. You may also get discounts on cultural events in the area. Also, do not forget about the Internet. There is a wealth of knowledge on different forums and websites that is easy to access.

Homeschooling is something that brings both tremendous challenges and remarkable rewards. In order to ensure that your homeschooling experience is both beneficial and enjoyable, a thorough understanding of homeschool precepts and techniques is critical. Keep the above information close at hand, and you will be prepared to thrive in your new role as teacher.